Archive

colonialism

France Trépanier and Chris Creighton-Kelly

Understanding Aboriginal Arts in Canada Today: A Knowledge and Literature Review

 Research and Evaluation Section Canada Council for the Arts April 2012

Trépanier’s and Creighton-Kelly’s research investigates an essential, but not a simple, question – how does one understand Aboriginal arts which are created in the territory known as Canada?

Skeena Reece Raven: On the Colonial Fleet, 2010

“I once heard an elder say that the great crime in this land was not that the natives had their language and culture beaten out of them in boarding schools – the great crime was that the people who came here did not adopt the culture of the land.” – Mike MacDonald

Trépanier and Creighton-Kelly use methods of observing, listening, respecting, remembering, regenerating, transmitting and healing to tell the connected stories of

Land ~ Peoples ~ Languages ~ Cultural Practices ~ Art

and find knowledge located in different places, in songs, baskets, moccasins, weaving, dreams, ceremony, language and political discourse

Inuvialuit Drummers and Dancers, Inuvik. Photographer: Chris Randle.

Alex Javier, Morning Star, Grand Hall of the Canadian Museum of Civilization

Robert Houle, Paris/Ojibwa, 2010

“In Native culture, stories are not simply stories. They are told and retold so that ! they resonate in the present, not as myths and legends, but as a vital part of  history. They teach critical lessons and cultural values, like bravery and the necessity of communication.” Candice Hopkins

Please read and become a pocket of wisdom and wakefulness

Understanding  Aboriginal  Arts  in  Canada  Today


Stained (piped sugar graffiti) by Shelly Miller

Sugar piped onto a public wall a decorative architectural ephemeral image of a colonial conquest ship carrying sugar and slaves – wealth for some, ruin for others. The sugar graffiti will crumble over time. In Waddington Alley, Victoria BC. Shelly Miller’s project blog